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Stamp duty on property in Ireland

Stamp duty is a tax the government levies on the purchase of all residential property whether new or old.

Since the Budget of 8 December 2010, the rate is 1% for properties valued up to €1 million and 2% for all property above that.

All exemptions such as those for first-time buyers have been abolished unless a binding contract was already in place on or before that date.

Who pays Stamp duty

The duty is paid by the purchaser so you should factor this into your calculations both of the purchase price and the amount you will need to borrow .

When is Stamp Duty paid?

Normally, your solicitor will arrange to pay the stamp duty on your behalf.

However, he will need to have the funds from you before he pays it. Therefore, you will need to pay the stamp duty to your solicitor on completion day.

Stamp duty on Sites and Land

The following are the rates of stamp duty which apply to sites and land in Ireland:
Value Duty
up to €10,000
€10,001 to €20,000
€20,001 to €30,000
€30,001 to €40,000
€40,001 to €70,000
€70,001 to €80,000
€80,001 and over
0%
1%
2%
3%
4%
5%
6%

How much is Stamp Duty on residential property

The rate payable depends on the purchase price paid. Since the 2010 budget, the rates are as follows:
 
First Time buyer
Other buyers and investors
Purchase Price New house Second hand house New house Second hand house
Up to €1,000,000
1%
1%
1%
1%
Over €1,000,000
2%
2%
2%
2%
   
How does this compare? Ireland’s stamp duty on land is high, more than twice the stamp duty in New South Wales, Australia
property in ireland
 
Irish property